Nouns That Start With Z

Z, pronounced "zee" or "zed" depending on where you're from, is one of the language's rarest letters. Z words are necessarily unusual, because this particular holdover from Greek just doesn't drop in on English very often.

nouns that start with z nouns that start with z

But fear not! If you find yourself tongue-tied when it comes to nouns beginning with Z, we have the perfect word list for you. We've gathered 50 nouns that start with Z to illustrate how the letter is used in English.

Advertisement

50 Nouns That Start With Z

Here, we've highlighted 50 nouns that start with Z. It is a rare letter, so many of these words may seem a bit obscure. That's intentional. Grappling with unusual words, catching the recurring elements, and identifying prefixes and suffixes, is an important part of getting to grips with English as a whole.

Noun

Definition

Synonym

z-axis

one of the three axes of Cartesian math, perpendicular to axes x and y

z-score

deviation from the mean (average) of a set of statistics

zag

a movement characterized by sharp angles

zig

zakat

the practice of giving a certain proportion of one's wealth to the poor, one of the Five Pillars of Islam

alms, tithe, tzedakah

zap

(informal) electricity or energy, or to produce a similar sensation

jolt, shock, sizzle

zeal

intense enthusiasm, fervor

eagerness, intensity, passion, zest

zealot

fanatical believer

devotee, enthusiast, fanatic, partisan

zeaxanthin

natural yellow pigment that occurs in corn, egg yolk and the human retina

zebra

black and white striped horse from Africa

equus quagga, equus zebra

zebrafish

small freshwater fish of South Asia with zebra-like stripes

Danio rerio

zee

the letter Z

zayin, zayn, zed, zeta, zoyen

zeitgeist

spirit or quality of a particular time and place

atmosphere, milieu, tenor

zenith

top, peak or highest point of an object or process

acme, apex, pinnacle, summit

zephyr

light, pleasant gust of wind

aura, breeze, wind

zeppelin

large aircraft held aloft by an envelope of lighter-than-air gas

airship, blimp

zest

excitement, emotional energy

ardor, enjoyment, flavor, gusto,

zig

a sharp movement at an angle

zag

ziggurat

a Sumerian monument built of large stone steps

zigzag

a side-to-side series of movements

chevron, cringle-crangle, stagger

zinfandel

species of black grape, also the wines made from that grape

crljenak kaštelanski, primitivo, tribidrag

zilch

slang for zero, none

bubkes, nada, nothing, zip

zillion

slang for a very large number

bunch, loads, lots, tons

zinc

bluish-white metal, number 30 on the periodic table

zine

short magazine, usually self-published

chapbook, pamphlet

zing

emotional excitement or stimulation

energy, thrill, tingle, zip

zinger

quick joke or funny reply

bon mot, one-liner, retort

zionism

pursuit of a Jewish national state

zip

enthusiasm, energy, excitement

jazz, pizzazz, thrill, zing

zipline

rope hung at an incline to provide an exciting slide

ziploc

airtight seal on a plastic bag

zipper

fastener made of alternating metal teeth

zircon

zirconium silicate, naturally occurring as a clear to brown crystal, can be refined into a gemstone

zirconia

zirconium dioxide, naturally occurring as a white powder, can be refined into a gemstone

zirconium

grey-white metal, number 40 on the periodic table

zit

pimple, particularly one caused by acne

boil, carbuncle, furuncle, sore

ziti

a type of tubular pasta

manicotti, penne

zodiac

pattern of constellations said to reveal the future

augury, horoscope

zombie

mindless undead monster

ghast, ghoul, vampire

zone

a particular area, a space marked for a purpose

area, region, sector

zoning

the action of breaking an area down into zones for planning

districting, urban design

zoo

place where animals are kept for humans to observe

menagerie, wildlife park

zookeeper

one who cares for the animals at a zoo

animal tender, wrangler, zoologist

zoologist

scientist who studies animals

entomologist, herpetologist, ichthyologist, mammalogist, naturalist

zoology

the scientific study of animals

entomology, herpetology, naturalism

zooplankton

mobile microscopic animals in fresh or seawater

plankton, protists, protozoans

zoot

man's suit, popular in the 1930s and 1940s, with baggy high-waisted trousers and padded shoulders

zoot suit

zoroastrianism

monotheistic religion of Persia (in modern Iran)

zoster

belt or girdle worn by men in ancient Greece

belt, girdle, zoné

zucchini

edible cylindrical green gourd

courgette

zygote

embryo in its earliest phase of development

embryo, fertilized cell, fetus

What Is A Noun?

Given the simplest possible definition, a noun is a word representing a thing. More specifically, a noun represents a person, place, object or idea. Whether it's as simple as going to the zoo or as complex as zeaxanthin, we interact with nouns every day.

Advertisement

Types of Nouns

In addition to whether they represent a person, a place, a thing or an idea, nouns can also be organized into groups based on how they work in language. Some of the most common groups follow.

  • Abstract nouns represent the "idea" part of "person, place, thing or idea." Concepts like "capitalism" or "joy" are abstract nouns: we can't see or touch them, but they certainly exist.
  • A collective noun refers to a group of people or things, such as a "team" of basketball players or a "committee" of politicians.
  • As a rule, if a noun doesn't fit in any of the other listed categories, it's a common noun. Common nouns are by far the majority of nouns, ranging from aardvarks to zymometers.
  • A possessive noun indicates that something belongs or relates to the noun in question, and it is almost always followed by an apostrophe and an "s." For example, in the phrase "Zelda's cheese," "Zelda's" is a possessive noun. Note that possessive nouns are often proper nouns, as with cheese-loving Zelda, but they don't have to be. Whether you're talking about a "ball's" trajectory, a "computer's" RAM or a "game's" high score, you're using possessive nouns.

To use proper nouns properly, you need to know that they're the formal names of people, places, things or ideas. For example, in the sentence "Zach is a zealot," "zealot" is a common noun, but Zach is a proper noun. Proper nouns should always be capitalized.

Nouns That Start With Z
Advertisement

10 Example Sentences With Z Nouns

Here follow 10 sentences to show you how nouns starting with Z work in everyday written language. For more help with sentence structure, check out our sentence variety examples and articles on compound and declarative sentences.

  1. Debbie started her frustrating day by finding a big zit on her nose.
  2. She made herself pasta with zucchini and sat down to think.
  3. She reflected on her final class project on zooplankton.
  4. She had been so enthusiastic about her studies, but now she felt like a zombie in her cubicle job.
  5. But, she couldn't suppress a smile as she looked at the zirconia on her finger.
  6. Debbie poured herself a glass of zinfandel and reflected on all the good things in her life.
  7. Debbie promised herself to connect with the zookeeper tomorrow to look for jobs in her field.
  8. Happy with her plan, Debbie enjoyed the warm zephyr from her balcony.
  9. She roused herself to do her evening stretches with her usual zeal.
  10. Tomorrow was another day, one she intended to live to its zenith.

Discover More Z Words

If you're not ready to move on from Z, you'll be glad to learn that there are still more words to explore. Go to Wordfinder by YourDictionary for even more terms that begin with the letter Z, revealed in order by word length. Use the built-in search feature to limit to words of whatever length interests you the most. Or, quickly find options that include, begin or end with certain letters or combinations of letters. WordFinder's word list feature makes easy work of creating your own custom lists of words that start with Z or any other letter that you want to explore.

Advertisement

Catching Zs

Zs can be tricky, but there's no better way to obtain real expertise with English. Getting your head around English's resident Greek refugee is one of the real challenges of the language. Once you've got it, you're golden for anything else this curious tongue can throw at you. Need more? We've got you covered. For even more lexicographical learning, check out Adjectives That Start With H.