Pronoun Worksheets for a Simple Elementary-Level Introduction

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After a grammar lesson on pronouns, students may benefit from some extra practice. A collection of free pronoun worksheets cover different types of pronouns for elementary students of all levels. Just click on the PDF worksheet you want to use, then download and print. Each one contains an answer key for easy grading.

Personal Pronouns Worksheet

Personal pronouns stand in the place of a name or a thing. They frequently act as the subject of a sentence. Elementary students complete five sections in a pronoun practice worksheet that covers the pronouns I, me, she, her, he, him, we, us, they, and them.

Elementary Pronoun Worksheet

Elementary Pronoun

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Subject and Object Pronouns Worksheet

Can students tell the difference between subject and object pronouns? Challenge them to match pronouns with the proper antecedents in an educational pronoun worksheet.

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Basic Possessive Pronouns Worksheet

Possessive pronouns like mine, yours, hers, his, ours, and theirs replace possessive nouns. Students identify the different possessive pronouns by underlining them in sample sentences.

basic possessive pronouns worksheet

Basic Possessive Pronouns

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Demonstrative Pronouns Worksheet

Demonstrative pronouns, including this, that, these, and those refer to people or items that are set apart from others. Students identify demonstrative pronouns, decide whether they are singular or plural, and determine if a pronoun is the subject or object of a sentence. They also practice identifying such, none and neither as demonstrative pronouns.

Find the demonstrative pronouns worksheet

Find the demonstrative pronouns

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Pronoun Memory Game

Looking for a more engaging way to test pronoun understanding? Have elementary students match subject and object pronouns with a memory game.

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Pronoun Memory Card Game

Pronoun Memory Card Game

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Indefinite Pronouns Identification Worksheet

Indefinite pronouns refer to a more general group of people or things. Older students identify indefinite pronouns by underlining them in example sentences and paragraphs.

indefinite pronouns worksheet

Indefinite pronouns

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Subject-Verb Agreement With Indefinite Pronouns Worksheet

For a subject-verb agreement challenge, students identify singular and plural indefinite pronouns and ensure each sample sentence has a verb that agrees with the subject.

Subject-verb agreement worksheet

Subject verb agreement worksheet

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Pronoun Practice Quiz

Elementary students practice all their basic pronoun skills at once with a pronoun quiz. It’s a nice pre-assessment before a grammar lesson, or a good way to determine what students have learned at the end of a unit.

Types of Pronouns Exercise

If you’re looking for a quick pronoun review, have students try out this exercise. Can they identify the type of pronoun used in each sentence below? The pronoun in each sentence is highlighted in bold.

  1. He likes to eat ice cream.
  2. Elizabeth likes me.
  3. I forgot my book; can I borrow yours?
  4. I am going to buy these.
  5. Anyone could figure that out.
  6. My friend likes these.
  7. Donnie sent her a birthday gift.
  8. Everyone went to the park that day.
  9. The neighbors didn’t have a barbecue, so we brought ours.
  10. I went to the park yesterday.
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Types of Pronouns Exercise Answers

The correct answers for the previous pronoun review section are:

  1. He likes to eat ice cream. (personal, subject)
  2. Elizabeth likes me. (personal, object)
  3. I forgot my book; can I borrow yours? (possessive)
  4. I am going to buy these. (demonstrative)
  5. Anyone could figure that out. (indefinite)
  6. My friend likes those. (demonstrative)
  7. Donnie sent her a birthday gift. (personal, object)
  8. Everyone went to the park that day. (indefinite)
  9. The neighbors didn’t have a barbecue, so we brought ours. (possessive)
  10. I went to the park yesterday. (personal, subject)