Thoughtful Ramadan Greetings and Wishes to Share

Over 1.5 billion people celebrate the Muslim holy month of Ramadan every spring. Even if you don't celebrate Ramadan yourself, it's polite to know how to wish someone a happy Ramadan. Keep reading for appropriate Ramadan greetings for the Muslim celebrants in your life.

Ramadan greetings example against night sky Ramadan greetings example against night sky

Ramadan Greetings in Arabic

There are a few standard greetings and Ramadan wishes that are encouraging to Muslims during Ramadan. Take a look at the most common Ramadan greetings in Arabic and what they mean in English.

Ramadan Mubarak

The most common greeting during Ramadan is Ramadan Mubarak (Rah-ma-dawn Moo-bar-ack). It essentially means "blessed Ramadan" or "happy Ramadan."

Ramadan Kareem

Ramadan Kareem (rah-ma-dawn kah-reem) means "have a generous Ramadan" or "noble Ramadan." It can also mean "may Ramadan be generous to you." Some people believe that it's most appropriate to use this greeting before or after the holy month, and not during Ramadan itself.

Eid Mubarak

Ramadan ends with Eid al-Fitr, "the festival of breaking the fast." It marks the end of fasting. You can wish someone Eid Mubarak (eed moo-bar-ack), which means "blessed feast," at the end of Ramadan.

Eid Kareem

Another greeting for Eid al-Fitr is Eid Kareem (eed kah-reem), which means "Have a generous Eid." You may also say kol 'am wa enta bekhair (kohl ahm wa en-ta bey-care), which means "may every year find you in good health."

Ramadan Wishes in English

You can wish someone a Happy Ramadan even if you don't speak Arabic. These phrases have been translated from Arabic and are common ways for non-Muslims to wish their friends and neighbors a blessed holy month. You can choose one of the following to say:

  • Wishing you all the blessings of the holy month.
  • May the crescent-shaped moon brighten your path toward enlightenment and may Allah bless you with peace and grace.
  • May this Ramadan bring joy, health and wealth to you.
  • May this Ramadan be as bright as ever.
  • I wish you four weeks of blessings, 30 days of clemency and 720 hours of enlightenment. Happy Ramadan!
  • May the Spirit of Ramadan stay in our hearts and illuminate our souls from within.
  • May Allah always guide you all throughout your journey in life. I wish this Ramadan will infuse you with courage that will help you be triumphant over the adversities of life.
  • As you fast and offer prayers to Allah, may you find your peace and happiness.
  • Have a peaceful and happy Ramadan.

These phrases are great in conversation and in written form. Those celebrating Ramadan will appreciate your reaching out to them and learning more about their celebration.

Basic Facts About Ramadan

Now that you know how to wish someone a happy Ramadan, take a moment to learn more about Ramadan itself. Understanding why Muslims regard Ramadan as the most sacred time of the year and other Arab culture rules will help you choose the most appropriate greeting.

  • The holy month of Ramadan celebrates the time in A.D. 610 when God revealed the Quran to the Prophet Muhammad. This sacred period invites Muslims to renew their spiritual relationship with God and to practice self-discipline.
  • Ramadan takes place during the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, which follows the lunar calendar. It is announced when a sighting committee spots the new crescent moon.
  • Ramadan ends with the next crescent moon, which begins Eid-al-Fitr.
  • Celebrating Ramadan includes fasting from sunrise to sunset. The fast only applies to able-bodied Muslims, however; children, pregnant women, those with health conditions, and the elderly are not expected to fast.
  • Fasting during Ramadan also includes refraining from negative thoughts, smoking and sexual activity.
  • If you are visiting an Islamic nation but do not celebrate Ramadan, you should not eat or drink in public spaces during the holy month.

The Beauty of World Religions

No matter what culture you belong to or holidays you celebrate, it's important to understand more about the beliefs of those around you. Doing so can help us move past tolerance and into genuine friendship and understanding. For more information about Ramadan and other celebrations around the world, read up on the five main world religions and their basic beliefs.

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