Anymore vs. Any More: Using the Right Term

Explore a quick and easy guide for when to use anymore vs. any more. Get a clear definition of each and examples, along with an easy trick for remembering when to use anymore or any more.

anymore vs any more example anymore vs any more example
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What Is the Difference Between Anymore vs. Any More?

When it comes to the battle between the hot contenders anymore and any more in the grammar royal, most people leave confused. Why? Because anymore and any more are similar words, but they can’t be used interchangeably. The reason why they can’t comes down to their own distinct meanings. Anymore is an adverb referring to time, while any more is a determiner referring to quantities.

Chart Breaking Down Anymore vs. Any More

Before breaking down these two terms individually, check out this handy chart for keeping them straight.

Anymore

Any More

Definition:

means something is not happening at present

describes a quantity of something with an indefinite amount

Type of Word:

adverb

determiner

Synonyms:

at present, for the time being

any, some

Example Sentence:

I don’t play Minecraft anymore; I like Roblox now.

I don’t have any more money to buy Robux.

The Adverb: Anymore

With a basic understanding of the difference between anymore vs. any more, it’s time to check out anymore in a bit more depth. Anymore is an adverb, so its job is to modify or qualify a verb, adjective or another adverb. So, when you use anymore as a single word, anymore is talking about time. It’s telling you that something is not happening at the present time or still. Though it’s relatively uncommon and not considered proper usage, anymore can also be a substitute for nowadays.

For example:

The price of bottled water is expensive anymore.

This would be understood as the price of bottled water is expensive nowadays.

Anymore in a Sentence

Definitions are great, but examples are even better. To truly see how anymore is used in English, dive into a variety of different examples.

  • We don’t go to Florida anymore during Spring Break.
  • I don’t really like that game anymore.
  • He doesn’t like to skydive anymore.
  • I don’t drive in the city anymore.
  • My mom doesn’t like to crochet anymore.
  • She used to be my love, but not anymore.

Did you notice anything in these examples? Except for the rare occasion where anymore is used in replace of nowadays, anymore is typically used in negative sentences.

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The Determiner: Any More

Now that you’ve seen anymore in action, it’s time to look at how "any more" comes into play. "Any more" is a determiner, so it is determining or deciding something in the sentence. In the case of "any more," it’s determining an undetermined quantity of something. "Any more" might be talking about a large amount or talking about a small amount. Whatever the case, "any more" is telling your reader that you want an amount of something.

Any More in a Sentence

Since that definition can get a bit confusing, it’s time to look at a few examples to drive this word home.

  • Do you have any more cereal?
  • Is there any more chicken left?
  • I can’t get any more money until I turn 18.
  • I can’t possibly eat any more.
  • She couldn’t eat any more if she wanted to.
  • If you need any more clothes, we can get them.

While "any more" can also be found in negative sentences, you can also use it in questions and in if-clauses.

Tricks to Remember the Difference Between Anymore vs. Any More

The difference between anymore and any more can get a little tricky. Sometimes, it’s helpful to use a fun mnemonic device to help you remember how anymore and any more are used.

I don’t eat cookies anymore because I don’t want any more cookies.

Anymore talks about a point in time, while any more talks about the quantity. And, it’s as simple as that.

The Anymore vs. Any More Debate

When it comes to the grammar royal between anymore and any more, both words are strong winners because you need them both to make perfect sentences. Interested in learning more about grammar variances? Check out in to vs. into to find out which is correct.